Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Passengers to Natal Jan - June 1871: miscellaneous arrivals


FROM THE NATAL WITNESS 1871
January 10 - Arrival
Verulam. Creak. London/Plymouth (November 1st)
Passengers
Messrs W and A Wiles, C Dearlove, P Valentin, JT Phillips, PP Moore, A Kent, JG Moret, GA Moore, WM and FJ Ash, Mr and Mrs Steyn

January 10 - Arrival
William Shaw. Haines. Inhambane
Passenger
Mr R Benningfield

January 13 - Arrival
RMS Natal. Diver. Cape Town (January 7th)
Passengers
Mrs Benn, Mr and Mrs Rooke, Mrs Stewart, Miss Arnold, Dr Gordon, Capt Spence, Ensign Jones, Mr and Mrs Schaedtler, Col Lowe, Dr Irving Mrs Richardson, Miss Dickson, Rev and Mrs Kriel, Messrs Button, Hawkins, Russell (2), Tobbin, Hilliard, Anderson, Litchfield, Schadtler, Wood, Langerveld, Butler, Schutze, Egerst (2), Flintoff, Stable, Stafford, Porson, 1 soldier, 1 woman and 5 children

January 23 - Departure
Alma. Findlay. For Melbourne
Passengers
Rev and Mrs Patten and 4 children, Mrs C and Clara Kenion, Mr A Cowley

February 03 - Departure
Margaretha. Schafer. Mauritius
Passengers
Capt Grantham and Mrs Koch

February 5 - Departure
Burton Stather. Warren. London
Passengers
Rev and Mrs Tyler and infant, Miss Tyler, Susan, Martha and William Tyler, Messrs B Lindley, H Rood, F Mellen, G Laing, J Barnes, Ward and HC Edmonds

January 14 - Arrival
Umvoti
Passengers
Mr and Mrs Arliss, Mrs Parige, Messrs, Herring, A Vickers, HN Daniel, FH Berry, HS and EP Paget, G Elland, A Smith, W Burbury, T Newington, W Plowright, J Barlsford, JH Mills, JE Smith, T Payne, J and R Middleton, G Rowes, DR Crow, A Sampson, T Hoskinson, G Wilkinson, HW Pearce, G Bigwell, Mrs Bigwell, Mrs Passmore and 2 children, Mrs Tillson and 2 children

February 24th - Arrival
Beethoven
Passengers
Dr, Mrs and Miss Aldrige, Miss Kersley, Miss Bainbridge, Messrs Bainbridge, Dougall, Davenhill, Galt, Hoffman, Hocklett, James Winter

February 19 - Arrival
Jarvis in Durban from London
Passengers
Mr, Mrs and Miss Darby, Mr and Mrs Higham, Mr and Mrs Paverd and son, Messrs Williams, Rowles, Fisher, Roxby, Smith, Lightfoot, Woodward, Simcock, Lowry, Hargreaves, Mr Ward and son

February 23 - Departure
RMS Natal. Diver. For Cape Town and Intermediate ports. Destination Southampton
Passengers
For Southampton
Messrs Grime, W Sterhn, Stracy, JG Rollis, Payne, Bennett and 2 children, Mrs Bale and son, Mrs Sydney 
For Cape Town
Dr and Mrs Maxham, Sergt and Mrs Doubleday and 2 children, Mr Samuelson, Mr and Mrs GT Hill, Mr CB Schultz, Mrs Niepoth, 4 men 2nd 20th Regiment. 1 man 32nd regiment

February 28 Departure
Beethoven. Cumming. London and Intermediate ports
Passengers
For Cape Town Messrs Blaithwait and H Williams, Mr and Mrs Robertson, Messrs Dearlove, Wilhelm and Mohr
For London
Messrs RJ Edmonstone, Aitken, R Thompson, Mr L Potgieter
For Mossel Bay

March 16 - Arrival
RMS Natal. Diver. From Cape Town and Intermediate ports
Passengers
Messrs Hurry, Higson, Maddren, Balington, Allison Banks, Rownsend, Whitehead, Gregor, Greenow, Marsh, Wilhelm, Tarbut, Mr and Mrs Hill, Miss Muller, Lieut Ballard, Capt and Mrs Vinigal, Dr Allard, Dr Stewart, Mrs Kent and child

March 25 - Arrival
Earl of Southesk. From London (January 7th)
Passengers
Mr and Mrs Roberts, Messrs Clapham, CH Hares, Jefkins, C Emmanuel, Wakefield, Loveridge, L Hughes, T Smith, Scongall, Reid, J Dempster, E Walker, EP Mitchell, Peek, HF Wood

March 24 - Departure
RMS Natal. Diver. Cape Town and Intermediate ports, destination Southampton
Passengers
Hon CA Ellis, Capt Spence, Mrs Windham and boy, Messrs J Anderson, MacLaren, C Peel, Ingle, WJ Boyd, W Stephen and CG Bales, Rev Mr Biccard and Mrs Sutherland, Rev WC Holden, Rev T Guard, Mrs McNicol, Messrs W March and Wood

March 26 - Departure
William Shaw. Haines. St Johns
Passenger
Mr Skilbeck

March 24 - Departure
Verulam. Creak. Destination London
Passengers
Mr, Mrs and Miss Garland, Miss Cowey, Mr and Mrs Lake, Mrs Passmore and child, Mr and Mrs Tootal, Messrs J Polkinghorne, Grant, Dill (2), Miles, Fisher and Krelland

April 21 - ? departure.
No name of vessel. Per Natal
Passengers
HE Lieut-General Hay, Major Campbell, Capts. Lempriere, King and Clarke, Lieut Burke, Major Elliott, Miss Williams, Mr and Mrs Lennon, Messrs Ritchie (2), Miss Lloyd, Mr and Mrs Gray, Mr and Mrs. Girvan, Mrs Richards and 3 children, Dr Grant, Messrs Ritchie, Wilson, Cox, Gray, Pym, Farringdon, Martin, Good, Sclander, Williamson, Van Zeller, Willis, Dartnell, Stewart, Dunn, Rohn, Flanders, Coqui, Wood, Portsmouth, Atkinson, Foot, Broadbent, Kingford, Bur, Edwards, Turner, Glover, Royston, Pilsworth, Chippendale, Bainbridge, Bishop, Williams, Foster, Inkenson, Houghton, Sergt Taylor, wife and child and a boy of the 32nd Regiment

April 20 - Arrival
SS Sweden. McKenzie. From London and the Cape
Passengers
P Davey and Chas Doodroff

April 28 - Departure.
No name of vessel. Destination Southampton
Passengers
Mr Edgar and son, Mr J Cox, Capt and Mrs Townsend and Child, Mr and Mrs Murray, Mr and Mrs Rooke, Mr Fleming and son, Messrs Remnant, RS Gladstone, JD Balance, AE Runciman, Hotchkin, J McKat, L Clephern and Lieut Phillips
For Cape Town
Lieut General Hay, Major Campbell, Capts Lempriere, Schafer, Carey R. E. 1 sargeant, wife and 5 children. R.E. 2 men 32nd Regiment, Messrs J Rose, C Gregorie, T Kestle, F Landers, Pepworth, Rev J Cameron, Mrs D'Arcy, Read and Mrs Robinson, Mr Krohn and Dr Grant

April 26 - Departure
AS Sweden. McKenzie. For London and the Cape
Passengers
For London
Rev and Mrs Brandt, Messrs Amos, Mr Greenwood

May 2 - Arrival
Goodhope
Passengers
E Carlton, D Fairweather, Dr Wilson

May 26 - Arrival
Sea Nymph. Hoffman. From East London
Passenger
Mr W Brunton

May 27 - Arrival
William Shaw. Haines. From St John's River
Passenger
Mr Skilbeck

May 5 - Departure
Umvoti
Passengers
For Mauritius
Messrs Le Roy, James and Miles
For Madras
Mr, Mrs and Miss Stewart and Family, Miss Vinnicombe

May 5 - Departure
Jarvis ex Durban destination London
Passengers
Rev and Mrs Boyd and 4 children, Mr, Mrs and Miss Collingworth, Messrs McLetchie, J Gay, J Park, W Walker

May 5 - Departure
Zeus
Passenger
Mr Herring

May 12 - Arrival
Nelly. V Albo. Mauritius
Passengers
D Moodie, W Hay, M Mollieres, H Sadgley, Boulanger

May 11 - Departure
William Shaw for Delagoa Bay
Passenger
Mr D Leslie

May 11 - Departure
Bibsy. Weineck. Delagoa Bay
Passengers
Messrs Spilhaus, H Kisch, Sampson

May 19 - Departure
No name of vessel
Passengers
Capt Holmes, Messrs McEwan, Hawkins, Dr Wilson, Mrs Ross, Mr and Mrs Sheward, Mr Johnson, Miss Raynor, Mrs Tarbutt, Mr Pinkerton, 1 Sergt 32nd Regiment

May 15 - Arrival
St Kilda. Hill. From Adelaide
Passengers
Mr and Mrs Buchanan, Mr and Mrs Tullas, Mr Tripnaker, Mr Dallas

May 13 - Departure
Actea. Parker. For London
Passengers
Mr and Mrs G Matterson and family, Mr Emanuel, Master and Miss Morris and Mrs James

May 26 - Arrival
Lumsden from England
Passengers
HG Bacher, B Bacher, HG Bacher, RT Haynes, GW Gray, A Gray, SA Gray, AT Gray, SA Lain and CE McMaster

May 23 - Departure
RMS Natal. Diver. Cape Town and Intermediate ports, Southampton
Passengers
Messrs Black, Powel, JA Colenbrander and 2 children, Henderson, Misses Henderson(2) and Master St G Henderson, Mrs Douglass and 2 children, Mrs Joanson, Mrs Middlebrook and 5 children, Mrs and Miss De Voss, Capt Eschalez, Messrs Sedgley, Hawkins, Praer, R Clarence, W Pearce, Mrs Robinson, Mr and Mrs Farmer and child, Dr and Mrs Blaine, P O'Grady, R McNab, Nixon

May 25 - Arrival
Riga. Morrison. From New York
Passenger
Mr Warber

June 6 - Arrival
Polly
Passengers
Mr and Mrs Adrian (2) children, Miss Gavin, C Owen, W Owen and Reynolds

June 6 - Departure
Lumsden for Cape Town and London
Passengers
For Cape Town
Mr and Mrs Hamelberg and 2 children
For London
Mr and Mrs G Pearson and 2 children, Miss Agnes Lockerbie

June 8 - Arrival
Celt for Natal
Passengers
Mrs Cato and 3 children and Governess, Sir H Becher (Bart), Mr Abrahams, Capt Rolleston, Mr Denison, Mr Mall, Mrs Bolls, Mrs Kirton, Mr Welbourne, Mr Cruikshank, Mr Pickering, Mr Colbourne, Mr Warwick, Mr Moss, Mr Albrecht, Mr Harris, Mr Hedley, Mr Smith, Mr Gray, Mr Gray (junior)

June 13 - Departure
Sea Nymph. Hoffman. For Melbourne
Passenger
Mr G Brunton

June 13 - Departure
Rob For Delagoa Bay
Passenger
JP Ablett

June 13 - Arrival
Priscilla. Brown. From London
Passengers
Mr and Miss Cotton, Miss Bayley, Mrs Grafton, Mr King, Mr and Mrs Breffit, Miss Lowe, Miss Davie, Messrs Brewer, Bennett and Woods

June 17 - Arrival
RMS Natal. Diver. From Cape Town and Intermediate Ports
Passengers
Miss Rasch, Mr and Mrs James, Col Cole, Lieut Allen, Rev Mr and Mrs Cole and child, Reverend Cameron, Miss Archibald, Messrs Beverhoudt, Sugden, Keighly, Worsley, Schultze Braithwaite, Hunter and son, Peace, Clarence, Henry, Geigerm Hawksworth, Furst, Krantz, Keane, Mrs Field and child

June 18 - Arrival
Illovo. Bolton. From London
Passengers
Major LP Fadity, Messrs William Faddy, Jos L Wright, William James, Tony Hair, Robert Anderson, Mr and Mrs Hensman and 5 children, Mr and Mrs Fred Smith, Mr and Mrs Fred Ashford, Mr and Mrs. Chas. Haycroft, Mr Thos Bell, Mr Chas. Palmer
Black Death at sea aboard the Illovo on May 7th 1871, Edward James (second son of Mr RW James of PMBurg) aged 21 years

June 23 - Departure
RMS Natal. Diver. Cape Town and Intermediate ports to Southampton
Passengers
For Southampton
Messrs Maitland, Pout, Hassel, E Snell, Braithwaite, Lieut Cochrane, Miss Jones, Mrs Wright
For Cape Town
Capt Holmes, Messrs Thompson (2), 2 men 32nd Regiment, Mr and Mrs Lannan, Messrs Barns, Thompson, Dr Wilson, Sergt Carter, wife and 4 children. 1 man 2xx Regiment

June 25 - ? Arrival or Departure
Congune. Steyn. Delagoa Bay
Passengers
Messrs Benningfield, Skilbeck, Erskine and DuBois

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Passengers per Melrose to Natal 1880

On Saturday 10 July 1880 the Natal Mercantile Advertiser reported that 'considerable interest was manifested' on the arrival the day before at Natal from the Cape of the ship CRMS Melrose carrying 100 immigrants. The immigrants had been engaged in England by Mr Walter Peace, and had come out on the Balmoral Castle, under the auspices of the Immigration Board.

The Natal Mercury on the same day gave more detail:

'About 11.45 yesterday forenoon the CRMS Melrose was signalled from the Bluff as coming along the coast, and about 12.30 she came to the outer anchorage. It being well known that the Melrose was bringing a large number of immigrants the scene at the Point was one of unusual activity. Shortly after noon the tug Fox left the wharf for the Melrose. She had on board, in addition to the passengers for the Florence, Mr. Reid, acting for the Protector of Immigrants and Dr. Addison.

The Captain of the Melrose having declared as to the bill of health, the immigrants were at once visited by Mr. Reid. There were 100 immigrants on board ex Balmoral Castle who had come, some with free and some with assisted passage. The following are the occupations of the immigrants:- domestic servants 2, wheelwright 1, shipwright1, stone mason 2, plasterers 2, dressmaker 1, farm labourers 3, joiners 2, stereotype (sic) 1, gardeners 3, blacksmith 1, tailors 2, watchmaker 1, reader 1, cooper 1, printers 3*, machinist 1, for the Mounted Police 5.

The remainder of the immigrants are coming in the Venice. It was thought that the immigrants would be landed yesterday but the bar was so rough that it was considered advisable not to land them, but very probably they will be brought ashore today.

A great crowd, probably friends of the immigrants, had collected on the wharf on the return of the Fox but were much disappointed on learning that their friends were detained. As usual tents have been erected close to the Police Station for such of the immigrants as may have no friends to receive them. The passenger list of the Melrose will be found in our shipping column.

The following is the Melrose's report:- Left Cape Town 5th July 10.30 p.m.; arrived Algoa Bay 7th July 4.45 p.m., left 6 p.m.; arrived at East London 8th July 7.25 a.m., left 8.45 a.m.; arrived at Natal 9th July 12.15 p.m.

Experienced from Cape Town to East London light variable airs and fine weather, thence to Natal moderate breeze and fine weather.'

*Some of the immigrants were destined for employment by the firm of P Davis & Sons. The passenger list is grouped in families. Note that the first name and initial mentioned in the list is not always that of the head of the family, as some of these men had travelled ahead of their wives and children and were the Applicant rather than Immigrant; these would have been waiting to welcome the family on their arrival. A few were women travelling alone, one example being A W HUNTER who was to take up employment as a domestic servant. Some of the men were recruits for the Natal Mounted Police.

VESSELS MENTIONED

For about 20 years Melrose was a well-known visitor at Natal, regularly undertaking the coastal route between there and the Cape. Built in 1877 in Glasgow, her maiden voyage up the coast was not a success; she had to be towed back from Mossel Bay by Taymouth Castle. Weeks later, she had to put into East London with a broken shaft. She achieved dubious fame in July 1883 (presumably not the same voyage as the one reported above) when the Irishman James CAREY, a Fenian implicated in the Phoenix Park, Dublin murders of May 1882, was shot dead in the second class saloon of the Melrose shortly after she left Table Bay. Her Captain, BECHER, was later chief witness at the Old Bailey trial of Carey's killer.

The Balmoral Castle (the first ship of this name, built 1877, Glasgow, 2,48 tons) brought Sir Bartle Frere to his new appointment as Governor of the Cape in 1877. One of Currie's mailships she was soon superseded by larger and faster vessels, and by 1882 was in the hands of Spanish owners and renamed San Augustin. She then returned to the British register under her original name and was seen in Australian and New Zealand waters carrying frozen meat. Chartered by the International Line the Balmoral Castle was once more a visitor to Table Bay, until she was sold to a Quebec company, renamed Madiana and was eventually lost on a voyage from New York when she was wrecked on reefs off Bermuda 10 February 1903 carrying 82 passengers. No lives were lost.

The coaster Venice (511 tons, built 1878 in Glasgow) was intended for the South African inter-Colonial trade and ran between various coastal ports for about 20 years. Sold to an owner in Lourenco Marques in 1898 she was renamed Lusitano, later being converted to a hulk.

PASSENGERS BY MELROSE (EX BALMORAL CASTLE TO CAPE TOWN) ARRIVED NATAL 9.7.1880 

HUNTER, M 
PAWSON, W 
PAWSON, L 
PAWSON, F 
PAWSON, C 
HARDY, L 
EARNSHAW, R 
LEDDRA, J 
LEDDRA, M 
LEDDRA, M 
LEDDRA, J 
LEDDRA, M 
CONNEL, D 
CONNEL, J 
HOSKISON, M 
HOSKISON, J 
HOSKISON, J 
REID, T 
REID, M 
REID, J 
REID, M 
REID, S 
REID, T 
GORRIE, D 
GORRIE, M 
GORRIE, W 
GORRIE, J 
GORRIE, C 
BROWN, S 
GIBSON, J 
ADAMSON, G 
PATERSON, W 
HENDERSON, P 
HENDERSON, M 
HENDERSON, E 
ANDERSON, J 
CLARKSON, W 
PEDDIE, T 
NEASHAM, W 
NEASHAM, M 
NEASHAM, M 
NEASHAM, J 
NEASHAM, C 
NEASHAM, J 
YOUNG, J 
MCQUARRIE, J 
BURTON, W 
BURTON, F 
LOCKE, M 
LOCKE, B 
LOCKE, B 
FENWICK, R 
DIXON, J 
DIXON, M 
DIXON, E 
DIXON ,W 
DIXON, T 
DIXON, M 
DIXON, S 
SMITH, T 
SMITH, H 
SMITH, H 
SMITH, L 
DAWSON, W 
DAWSON, M 
DAWSON, W 
DAWSON, A 
DAWSON, J 
DAWSON, T 
DAWSON, J 
DAWSON, A 
CRAIBE, W 
CRAIBE, J 
CRAIBE, C 
CRAIBE, J 
CRAIBE, E 
WHITE, C 
EXCELL, W 
EXCELL, S 
EXCELL, S 
EXCELL, W 
EXCELL, W 
EXCELL, J 
EXCELL, A 
EXCELL, P 
SMITH, W 
SMITH, F 
EVEREST, T 
EVEREST, M 
EVEREST,A 
SHAW, J 
SULLIVAN, E 
SULLIVAN, L 
SULLIVAN, F 
SULLIVAN, P 
HUNTE, A W 
WRIGHT, D 
MCNAMARA, H 
BELLEMAINE, H 
BELLEMAINE, S 
BELLEMAINE, H 
BELLEMAINE, G 
BELLEMAINE, F 
BELLEMAINE, W 
BELLEMAINE, P 
BELLEMAINE, O 
SANDFIELD, G 
GULSON, J 
GULSON, E 
GULSON, F 
O'HARA, D 
HOPKINS, C 
HOPKINS, E 
HOPKINS, F 
WATSON, T 
WATSON, M 
WATSON, M 
GEORGE, W 
HOLLAND, C 
PUTTOCK, W



The coaster Melrose, Donald Currie's line, built 1877 Glasgow.


Saturday, September 27, 2014

Souvenir Saturday: Landing by Basket at Natal



'As the mail boats now come into Durban Harbour alongside the wharf,
 this mode of transit is done away with ,,,'  
remarks the sender of
this postcard, not without relief.

Passengers were still sometimes being landed by this method in 1899, including Boer War troops. Larger ships had to anchor outside though the Battle of the Bar (dredging etc to deepen the shallows) continued. 

The basket was lifted by the ship's derricks, lowered over the ship's side on to the deck of a lighter or tug below (which may well have been dancing up and down in choppy seas).On arrival the door of the basket was opened and the men emerged, slightly paler than they were before. The basket returned for another load. If there was a swell running the process could be held up for days. When ships could berth at the wharf, horses and mules were slung in canvas contraptions directly from the ship on to the wharf: terrifying for the animals but an improvement from the days of the Anglo-Zulu War  when this had to take place in the roadstead (i.e. outside the harbour). Incidentally, 352 864 horses and 104 000 mules were imported during the Anglo-Boer War, as well as 448 435 men.
.

Friday, September 26, 2014

Francis Farewell's wife

Was Francis Farewell married? - asks a reader of this blog. Yes, he certainly was. Shelagh Spencer gives the details (Vol 6 of British Settlers in Natal) as follows:

1822 Aug 17 - Farewell married Elizabeth Schmidt, daughter of Ludwig Wilhelm Schmidt ... and his wife Carolina Petronella Wolhuter, aunt of F M Wolhuter* who in later years was a prominent Pietermaritzburg resident. 

Schmidt had come to the Cape as a soldier, and afterwards had farmed at Stellenbosch. He died when Elizabeth was a child, and her mother then married Johann Ludwig Petersen, of Magdeburg, who had also been a soldier. He and Carolina had a boarding house in Cape Town, at which Farewell had been resident, hence his encountering Elizabeth. ... Under their marriage contract Farewell settled 3 000 pounds on Elizabeth.

For much more on this fascinating topic, as well as information on Farewell's rarely discussed earlier naval career, see the above source.

*F M Wolhuter is of particular interest to Mole as he claimed to have known Captain William Bell when the latter was serving on the vessel Thorne at the date of her wreck in 1831.




Mrs Farewell as she might have looked when out of doors at the encampment at Port Natal in 1826. She wears a simple muslin dress, the waist a little higher than normal,  and the sleeves with high puffs. These had been popular since the beginning of the decade. The typical long sleeves have cuffs which fall over the wrists and one wonders how the daily tasks were carried out with this extraordinary impediment. Mrs Farewell wears a Cape-made plaited straw bonnet over her white cornette cap. [Drawing by Daphne Strutt.]


Thursday, September 25, 2014

Passengers to Natal per Globe 1850

Natal Witness 13 September 1850
ARRIVAL OF THE GLOBE
This vessel, after a fast passage of 76 days from London, was apparently able to enter the harbour immediately rather than anchoring outside in the roadstead.

The report in the Natal Witness September 13 1850 mentions that she carried 'Messrs JC Byrne and Co's large iron hotel' among her other cargo. Packed into crates, the corrugated iron sheets were intended to provide an 'instant' 22-room structure, another of Byrne's brilliant but ill-fated notions. Moreland, through shortage of money, was forced to offer the materials for sale to the Government but this idea came to nought and eventually the hotel, never assembled, formed part of the assets auctioned off in Byrne's insolvent estate.

Among the passengers was Charles BARTER (incorrectly given in the Witness as BARBER), later author of 'The Dorp and the Veld', 1852. Robert BABBS became a pioneer sugar farmer. Daniel WASHBOURNE brought with him the tools required for erecting Byrne's hotel, and was for a time employed by Moreland as a clerk and tutor to the latter's children. Robert DAWNEY became the successful owner of a Pietermaritzburg pharmacy, and a fellow passenger, CHALLINOR, also prospered as a chemist.

ARRIVED

September 4th - The schooner Henry Warburton, 152 tons, from Liverpool, Captain P.W. Pentin. To come into the Harbour the first fair wind. Ten cabin passengers, and general cargo.

Mr Holden Splatt 
Mr James West, senior 
Mr James West, junior 
Mr Henry West 
Mr Richard Houston and lady 
Mr Wm. Booth, and man servant 
Mr Frank Eastwood 
Mr Henry Eastwood 
Mr Edward Parke Lamport, Agent.

September 6th - Hannah, schooner, G. Wetherall, from Cape Town.

September 7th - The barque Globe, 332 tons, Capt. John Liddell, came in without having anchored outside. Sailed from London on the 23rd of June. She contains Messrs J.C. Byrne and Co's large iron hotel, and general cargo.

The following is a list of the passengers:

Messrs 
Charles Barber (Barter) 
Richard Lawton 
Daniel Washbourne 
Henry J White and lady 
James Handley 
Henry Green 
Wm M Ravden (Rawden) 
HJ Leuchars 
Alfred George 
Robert Robertson and son Henry 
Wm Chutre (Chuter) 
John Gavin 
Wm Lewis 
GJ Challinor, lady and child 
Robert Babbs and lady 
Robert Dawney 
EP Lamport, Agent

SAILED 
The Sandwich, for Re-Union, with Cattle. 
The Fabberty, for Mauritius, with Cattle. 
The Rosebud, for Cape.

INSIDE 
Sarah Bell, Hannah, Globe, Flora, and Henry Warburton.

VESSELS EXPECTED 
From London 
Diamond, Toronto, Highland Maid, Nile and Justina.

From Hull 
Palace, Haidee, and a Schooner.

From Liverpool 
Unicorn

From Launceston 
Lalla Rookh

From Cape Town 
Water Witch

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

What does Heritage mean to You?

How will you be celebrating Heritage Day in South Africa today?

Perhaps because I’m a family historian I find heritage lurking in the minutiae of my ancestors’ lives, those heirlooms and memorabilia which are tangible links to the individuals whose DNA I carry.


For me, a Voortrekker woman’s kappie (sunbonnet) with its wondrously delicate, complicated stitchery, preserved behind glass in some museum, is more resonant, provokes more emotion, than a vast circle of bronze ox wagons standing silently on lonely veld, or the forbidding brick edifice of the Voortrekkermonument. 

On this Heritage Day, take a photograph of a small but vital item in your family history collection: a letter signed by your ancestor, a diary page, a medal (not forgetting its all-important engraved inscription on the rim), an obscure ambrotype in its frame, a handmade lace fichu miraculously preserved in tissue paper, a group photo – while you’re at it add the names of as many of the people as you can identify and ask other family members for help with those to whom you cannot put a name. Nothing worse than unidentified group pics.


My great grandfather’s service papers, giving details of his career in the British army up to his discharge at the end of the 1870s, mean more to me than monuments and scattered white stones on the field at Isandhlwana. Indeed, does that battle-scarred place, heavy with history and blood, require anything more than the mountain itself to mark the honour and courage of those British and Zulu soldiers who fell in its shadow? In this instance, the mountain, intrinsically part of our ‘natural’ heritage (like all mountains, trees, flora and fauna), takes on a separate, significant role emerging as ‘cultural’ heritage. 
Take a photograph of Isandhlwana or any geographical feature – or, if you prefer, a listed building, a plaque, a statue - of heritage import in your area and submit it to Wiki Loves Monuments – the annual competition closes today. Google it. While you’re on those pages have a look at other people’s submitted photographs showing what heritage means to them. It is a staggering and enlightening collection.





As family historians we find heritage speaking to us from gravestone inscriptions, where fortunate enough to find these have avoided vandalism or greed and still retain their lead letters – so many have been picked out of their granite beds, destroying vital information and defacing the memorial. Sometimes even the graves themselves are opened, in the vain hope of finding treasure trove within, but in the process unnecessarily disturbing ancestors whose bones lie there. 

Whose ancestors they may be is immaterial: they are, like the Unknown Soldier, representative of ALL ancestors and deserving of respect. Let us NOT vandalise any graves this Heritage Day! Take a photograph of a family tombstone – or ANY memorial inscriptions accessible to you and perhaps vital to other family historians; share them by putting the photos online through eGGSA’s gravestone volunteer project. Google it.

On Heritage Day spend some time tidying and consolidating your family history files, making sure they are backed up and also ensuring that, should you be run over by a bus tomorrow, someone else would be able to pick up the torch and continue your work with a reasonable understanding of the material you have collated so neatly! Tempus fugit. Start/Finish writing that family narrative! Publish or Perish!


And while you stand around the traditional Heritage Day braai with loved ones and other relatives, talk about your shared ancestors, spread the word, engender some interest in the topic among the younger generation (they are the ones who will pick up that torch of yours later), show them some of your jealously hoarded memorabilia, tell ancestral anecdotes which will remain in their memories and be retold on other Heritage Days. Phone or email a distant relative, visit a lonely one – make their day: they all have stories to tell, photographs and information to share.

These are just some of the hundreds of things you could do to mark this Heritage Day – make it special, productive and enjoyable rather than just another blank day in the calendar before, inevitably, work obtrudes and the Present once again gets in the way of the Past.

Happy Heritage Hunting.



Hamilton Family Group at Genoa, Stevenston, Ayrshiren



Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Passengers to Natal per Dane, Priscilla 1863

Natal Mercury June 23 1863

Arrived:
June 20, RMS Dane, from Cape Town and intermediate ports. Cargo, general. 
PASSENGERS 
From Cape Town: 
Lieut Harrison 
Messrs 
P Milner 
Briggs 
Baumes 
Hofstedt 
From Algoa Bay: 
Messrs 
Schieffs 
Moreland 
Tomlin 
Mr Henry (Consul General Belgium) 
Mr and Mrs Botha and child 
Mr and Mrs Thornhill and three children 
From East London: 
Miss Driver 
Messrs 
R Walker 
Johnson 
Lieut Tolner (Tollner) 
Dr Tate 
Mr and Mrs McKay and two children 
Professor Hansen 
Report: 
Left Table Bay June 12 at 3 p.m., arrived at Algoa Bay on the 15th, at 1 p.m.; left Algoa Bay on the 16th, at 1 p.m., arrived off East London on the 17th, at 1 p.m., sea too high to land; left East London on the 18th, at 1 p.m. arrived at Port Natal and came to anchor on the 20th, at 10.30 a.m. 
- J Brown, agent.

June, Priscilla, barque, 253 tons, G Brown, from London, sailed 2nd April. General cargo. 
PASSENGERS: 
Messrs 
J Vincent 
Herbert 
Reginal Bowers 
Gadsden 
Mrs Greening, son and daughter 
- Handley and Dixon, agents.

June 21, Eleonore, barque, 302 tons, C Jonains, from Algoa Bay, sailed 10th June. 
PASSENGER: 
Mr Hugill

June 21, Eveline, schooner, 101 tons, G Murison, from Cape Town, sailed 16th June, 
PASSENGER: 
Mr HB Portland 
- McArthur and Co., agents.

Sailed:

June 18, Heathel [sic, Heather] Bell barque 257 tons, R Thomas, to Ceylon, in ballast. 
PASSENGERS: 
Mrs Eastwood and two children.


Sunday, September 21, 2014

Passengers to Natal: Bermondsey and William Shaw 1862


Natal Witness 17 October 1862

ARRIVALS
Oct 9th - William Shaw, schooner, 39 tons, Ledson, from Port Elizabeth.
GC Cato, agent.

Oct 12th - Bermondsey, ship, 597 tons, Norsworthy, from London; sailed 9th April.
Agent: the Captain.

PASSENGERS
Mr and Mrs Yearsley
Mrs R Norsworthy
Mrs Turner
Miss Oliver
Miss B Flower
Miss EF Burnett
Messrs
Wood
Bowman
Taylor
White
Oldham

For Moulmein (in Burma?)
Messrs
Warwick
Simkins

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Souvenir Saturday: Durban Market Square 1860s



Market Square, Court House, Post Office, Mart etc, Durban.ca 1862

This is as close as we'll get to a contemporary photo of Durban when my great grandfather Thomas Alfred Gadsden arrived on the barque Priscilla in 1863. His first employment was as turnkey at the local gaol, unfortunately not shown in this picture.


molegenealogy.blogspot.com/2010/02/natal-immigration-in-1860s.html

molegenealogy.blogspot.com/p/keeper-of-bluff-light.html

Friday, September 19, 2014

St Helena Records on Display for Heritage Day

Heritage Day Exhibition

Friday 26 September
Time: 9:00-16:30
Saturday, 27th
Time: 9:00-12:00
At Meadowridge Library, Howard Rd, Bergvliet. 

On display will be St Helena Records, Census Lists, family trees and more.

Entry is free. 

Contact Merle Martin
South African St Helenian Heritage Association.
0217018422,
0768433541,
saint.helena.island@gmail.com